What are the benefits of neutering your pet - Midsomer Veterinary Centre Skip to content

What are the benefits of neutering your pet

Midsomer Vets - What are the benefits of neutering your pet
Midsomer Vets - Dog neutering

If you do not intend to breed from your dog, them we recommend having your dog neutered.

Not only does it prevent unwanted litters, but it also has many health factors that should be taken into consideration.

 
Spaying a female

Why should my bitch be spayed?

  • Reduces the risk of mammary tumours (breast cancer)
  • Prevents diseases being passed onto off-spring
  • Reduces behavioral problems, such as straying or dominance.
  • It prevents them from contracting life threatening uterine infections, more commonly know as pyometra. We frequently see this in older bitches. It can require risky emergency surgery.
  • It prevents false pregnancy and uterine infections.

What happens when my bitch is spayed?

The spay operation involves the administration of a general anaesthetic and the surgical removal of the ovaries and uterus. The fur at the site of the incision will be shaved before surgery.

She will normally be admitted on the morning of her operation and will stay with us for the day. She will be able to return home later on the same day and advise that she is kept quiet. 

The charge for neutering will also cover routine post operative examinations and pain killers, to ensure your little bundle is recovering back to full health.

When to spay

We can spay before the first season, at around 5 months old although in larger breeds it is recommended that they have at least one season before neutering so please contact us for advice. After a season we would normally recommend waiting 3 months before spaying. 

 
Castrating a male

Why should my dog be castrated?

  • Castration removes the risk of testicluar tumours
  • Prevents unwanted litters
  • Reduces the risk of prostate problems and some hormone related tumours.
  • Castration can also alter behaviour problems, such as aggression and straying.

​What happens when my dog is castrated?

​The castration operation involves removing both testes under general anaesthetic through a small incision just in front of the scrotum. We usually use dissolvable stitches under the skin surface which do not require removal.

He will be admitted on the morning of his operation and will stay with us for the day. He will be able to return home later on the same day and advise that he is kept quiet. 

The charge for neutering will also cover routine post operative examinations and pain killers, to ensure they are recovering back to full health.

When to castrate

Unless there is an urgent need, we normally wait until dogs have reached sexual maturity at six to seven months before neutering for behavioural reasons. Large breeds are normally neutered from 12 months old and giant breeds from 18 months to reduce the risk of joint problems.

Once your dog has been neutered there is a risk for him/her to become obese. We recommend feeding a ‘neutered dog’ diet designed to meet the different nutritional requirements of a neutered dog. One of our vets or nurses will be only to happy to give advice.

We will also invite your little one back for a FREE weight check with one of our nurses, approximately 10 weeks after being neutered, to ensure their weight hasn’t altered too much.

Neutering can sometimes affect your pet’s coat, especially in spaniels and red setters. If you wish to discuss this please contact us.

Non-permanent neutering by use of a hormone implant is also available. If you wish to discuss this please get in contact.

To get your dog, cat, rabbit or ferret neutered please feel free to call us on 01761 412132 or contact us via our online form

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